Archive for the ‘decay’ Tag

Back Whence It Came   6 comments


Back Whence It Came

~

Tree. Wood. Ore. Metal. A wagon forged by the hand of a man. All will decay. Nothing lasts forever.

~

We descended to the bottom of the trail shortly before 5PM, knowing our target. Placed near the equipment shed for the old Stone House, these wagons have been in place and deteriorating beautifully for years.

Unfortunately, since it was 5 o’clock, a few maintenance people were converging on the shed, parking their trucks in all the good spots. Problem. I didn’t think twice before walking up to one of them and jocularly saying, “You know, I traveled over 1,000 miles just to shoot these wagons.” Oh… you’ll move your truck? Why, thanks!

The guys were talking together, but surely also sizing up these people from ‘Away.’ One of them, an older gentleman in bright red suspenders who looked like a cross between Albert Einstein and Kris Kringle, was Frank. I know this because he had a huge sign made of welded pipe running across the back window of his pickup truck – his “Office”.

The sign said, “F – R – A – N – K

I asked him, “Are you Frank?”

“Nope. I’m Ernest,” he replied in a deep New England accent.

“Somehow I doubt that,” I said as we shared a knowing laugh.

And with that, we were introduced to Frank Eastman, a colorful local who has tended the grounds of the Stone House for several decades. After the other guys went home, we chatted with Frank for quite a while. He had worked with the Maine DOT for many years. We talked about how someone had once offered to restore the wagons for display, but Frank had declined, preferring to see them decay in their natural form. After a time, he felt comfortable enough to let us in on a local trail secret — a waterfall that most people don’t know about — and he asked if I could shoot it for him someday.

That’s for next year, when I’ll likely meet up with Frank again. Some people you just want to keep in touch with.

Under the First Layer   4 comments


Under the First Layer
~

To the same location where Molasses and I Fought the Lawn… were shot, I returned the other day with prints in hand to give to the elder Mr. Riggs, who owns the granary and feed store on the property. It was my way of getting him to allow unfettered access to the remainder of the property… and it worked. Well, he wouldn’t let me inside any of the buildings, but there was much to be seen as I worked my way through the woods and fields.

There’s nothing modern about this place. All the barns, silos, and tin buildings are worn and weathered, with some close to collapse.

I worked my way around one large building and found this vignette on the back and propped my tripod between the building and a large pecan tree that had fallen thanks to Hurricane Irene. I marveled at the slow collapse of the wooden siding, boards holding on by just a few nails here and there, and the weathered look of old tar paper and wood being revealed bit-by-bit over time.

~

This is a 9-frame HDR processed using both Photomatix Pro and HDR Express/32 Float. Also of note is that post-processing in Photoshop was done with the brandy-new Color Efex Pro 4 from Nik Software, now in beta. We’ve just been released to speak of the new program, and lemme tell you… it’s a great update!

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries | Facebook

“Old Baldy” Lighthouse   12 comments


"Old Baldy"
~

Meeting up with Bob Lussier during his visit to North Carolina, we decided to investigate a place I had never been, the Bald Head Island lighthouse, affectionately referred to as “Old Baldy.” This is the oldest standing — but no longer functioning — lighthouse in N.C., and was a worthy target not so much for the exterior shots, but for the rustic interior where Bob and I spent most of our time.

You can only reach this place by passenger ferry. Although the wait for the next boat was long, it gave Bob and I chance to have lunch and settle in with each other before we commenced to blasting away with the cameras inside the tower.

This is the obligatory outside shot. Soon, I’m sure, both Bob and I will be posting some images taken inside, where it was about 120F degrees.

Be sure to visit Bob’s blog today. As I understand it, he’ll be posting a picture of me taking this shot, as we did the other day with our images of the Boathouse.

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries | Facebook

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 159 other followers

%d bloggers like this: