Archive for the ‘coastal’ Tag

Sometimes, It Is…   4 comments


Sometimes, It Is...

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Gamble, an abandoned lobster boat found alongside Route 1 in northern Maine.

We woke up in the tent one morning and decided that it was too chilly to stick around outside, so we took a photo road trip up to Moosehorn NWR a few miles north of us. (Truck heater, yay!) Alongside the route, we found this poor, dilapidated beast in a vacant lot, an equally sad looking abandoned Gulf gas station.

We could only imagine what kind of story might be behind the vessel, its legacy on the water, and what conditions caused its demise.

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An HDR from five frames, the original version showed just how colorful and lucious the foliage was at the time, but I didn’t think that it set the mood for the image. Using a number of layer techniques and a subtle filter from OnOne, I tried to create the mood as I saw it on that cold and overcast day.

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Thanks! And Hope…   9 comments


Cobscook Bay

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Happy Thanksgiving to all!

The way I see it, it has been an incredible year. Since this time last year, I’ve been fortunate enough to continue doing what I love, part of which is sharing the results with all of you. The friends I’ve met and the camaraderie we’ve shared is truly something special, so thank you for following along and hooking up with me, as I have in turn been watching what you create.

This has also been a year of extraordinary change, both in the world and in our perspectives on what we’re doing here. Having been around for better than a half century now, I can’t recall a period of such transformation, save perhaps for the late ’60s. Some of the changes may be unsettling for some, but I can’t help but think that it will result in something better for all of us. At the very least, things aren’t boring and certain, which suits me.

There is currently – and always will be – suffering in the world, and on this Thanksgiving I think of all the people who are actively transforming (or even maintaining!) the status quo at their own peril, hoping for a better, freer, and safer place to be. Not all of us will agree with their messages or methods, either side, but their dedication should never be challenged, nor should their perspective be marginalized. As always, no one perspective is the single ‘right’ way, but neither can anyone ever be 100% wrong. There is something important to all points of view; now it’s a matter of figuring out how they – and we – will fit together.

We’re living in a time of unprecedented adventure. Will we make it? Sometimes it seems like a horse race, but we can hold out Hope, which is really all we can hope to have anyway. In the meantime, as photographers and creatives, we can satisfy ourselves by finding the beautiful things in the world and bringing them home to share with others. In a rather big way, that’s what gives me Hope.

So, thanks for what you do… you enrich the lives of others with your creativity and thoughtfulness.

Rob

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The image was taken at Cobscook Bay State Park in northern coastal Maine. Although it’s an HDR taken from eleven exposures, it would look much the same if I used the single middle exposure… the sunrise really was that spectacular. 

 
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Alien Landing   4 comments


Alien Landing
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On a little, one-lane back road in coastal Maine, not far from Eliot Coleman’s Four Season farm, aliens dropped a craft in the woods. In their language, the aliens call it a ‘Yurt.’

The yurt sits on the property called the Good Life Center, a hand-built house, garden and property constructed by Helen and Scott Nearing, well known back-to-landers. Helen and Scott are no longer with us, but volunteers and docents still work and maintain the property, and somehow visitors find their way to the center.

We thought it would be a good place to visit, as the Good Life Center is based on the ideals of self-sufficiency. In addition to a tended garden, the outlying areas have a well established permaculture in place. We stopped in to pick up some tips and ideas, as we’re heading in that direction with our own property now that Hurricane Irene saw fit to alter our landscape here in North Carolina.

We had a nice visit, and even left with a few Maine apples and a batch of heirloom Scarlet Runner beans that were cultivated by Helen Nearing. All in all, not a bad day.

“Old Baldy” Lighthouse   12 comments


"Old Baldy"
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Meeting up with Bob Lussier during his visit to North Carolina, we decided to investigate a place I had never been, the Bald Head Island lighthouse, affectionately referred to as “Old Baldy.” This is the oldest standing — but no longer functioning — lighthouse in N.C., and was a worthy target not so much for the exterior shots, but for the rustic interior where Bob and I spent most of our time.

You can only reach this place by passenger ferry. Although the wait for the next boat was long, it gave Bob and I chance to have lunch and settle in with each other before we commenced to blasting away with the cameras inside the tower.

This is the obligatory outside shot. Soon, I’m sure, both Bob and I will be posting some images taken inside, where it was about 120F degrees.

Be sure to visit Bob’s blog today. As I understand it, he’ll be posting a picture of me taking this shot, as we did the other day with our images of the Boathouse.

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Bob Lussier   6 comments


Bob Lussier
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A while back my online friend, Bob Lussier, told me that he was paying a visit to relatives in North Carolina and asked if I’d be available to get together for some fun and photography. Being a big fan of Bob’s work, I jumped at the chance.

I drove south to the Wilmington – Southport area to meet up with Bob, where we took a ferry out to Bald Head Island, home of the oldest standing lighthouse in North Carolina. It was a fantastic target, and we spent quite a bit of time inside the lighthouse, shooting stairwells, crumbling brick, and other bits of Rurex (Rural Exploration) goodness. We might’ve stayed in there even longer, but it felt like 120 degrees inside. By the time we exited the lighthouse, we were drenched. I tried to tell him not to visit in August, but would he listen? Nooooooo…..

On the way back to the ferry, we found this old boathouse sitting in the marshes… it was too good to pass up. To see the image that Bob captured as I took this shot of him, please visit the related post on Bob’s blog, Bald Head Boat House.

As it turned out, Bob and I got along extremely well, and while driving back to my hotel late that evening, I was startled to realize, “Hey, I just spent almost 12 hours with him and the time seemed to pass like minutes.” Bob’s a wonderful, affable guy. I’m really delighted that we had the chance to meet in person and share some time together.

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Hammonassetsunset   13 comments


A stunning sunset over water at Hammonasset Beach State Park, Connecticut

Hammonassetsunset

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It seemed an appropriate way to close out the week by posting a nice sunset image to go along with yesterday’s “Early One Morning” sunrise.  This also marks my fifth post out of five days, which is likely a record for me.

This was taken while staying at Hammonasset Beach State Park in Connecticut, the evening we landed at the campsite. We had been driving all day long, so strolling around to enjoy the quiet and serenity was just what we needed. We fancied that the fisherman came out of the large house on the right to catch his dinner on the jetty.

Six exposure HDR, f/7.1, 11mm, ISO 200. Merged in HDR Express, adjusted using 32 Float in Photoshop CS5, with Nik Color Efex Pro and Topaz DeNoise. This one seemed a real bear to process. Finding the right balance between foreground and background — so that neither looked out of place — was fairly challenging.

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Early American Screen Door   11 comments


An Early American Screen Door

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Just one of the many fun things about photography is that in researching your subjects, you can learn new things. I can’t suggest the number of times I’ve taken a picture of something interesting, only to find out more about it when I got home and cruised the internet looking for more information.

When I first developed this image, I decided to call it ‘Early American Screen Door.’ I figured that the wood slats on this shed door had deteriorated to the point that you could see through, and the wind would whistle through.

I showed the finished image to my neighbor — the one whose family farm is featured in GOAL!!, Cooning Boat, and Put Me In, Coach! The neighbor said, “The door is made that way deliberately in order to ventilate the corn crib.”

Call me a city boy, but I never knew that. Now it makes perfect sense.

I seem to always be pleasantly surprised at the ingenuity of previous generations during a time when there weren’t the amenities and conveniences that today we take too much for granted.

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