Archive for the ‘lighthouse’ Tag

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse   13 comments


The lighthouse at Bass Harbor Head, Mount Desert Island, Maine

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse - © 2011 Rob Hanson Photography

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On the southwest side of Mount Desert Island, far from the tourist-laden areas of Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park, is the easily accessible Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse.

Since it’s just a short walk from the parking lot down to the rocks, it’s probably one of the most frequently photographed lighthouses in Maine. I can safely suggest that on this evening, at least 100 pictures were taken, judging by the small crowd that crammed into nooks and crannies on the craggy rocks. As the sun began to set, more and more people filtered down the steep steps, looking for a place to shoot the lighthouse while simultaneously avoiding having other people in the frame. Not an easy thing to do…

I rather quickly tired of maneuvering with the crowd down below and decided to move up the hill a bit for a different perspective. I had my heavy boots on, so it was pretty easy to scramble over the rough rocks and set the tripod in a safe place to catch the sun behind the pine tree. Even that didn’t stop one intrepid couple from hiking directly into my frame, causing me to throw out one of the exposures.

It’s a jungle out there, but the rewards are great.

Since so many images have been taken of this lighthouse, I wanted my version to be as distinctive as possible, so I pushed the ‘painterly’ feel in processing rather than keeping it hyper-realistic. For this scene, I like how it worked out.

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HDR from eleven exposures +/-1EV, f/22, 31mm, processed with HDR Express, Photomatix Pro, Nik Color Efex Pro 4, Photoshop CS5

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Inside Old Baldy   7 comments


An interior view of Old Baldy, the Bald Head Island lighthouse, oldest standing lighthouse in North Carolina

Inside Old Baldy -- © 2011 Rob Hanson Photography.com

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I might have called this one “Stairway to the Hot Place” and it would have been an apt description.

Bob Lussier and I had traveled by passenger ferry to get to this place, the oldest standing lighthouse in North Carolina, Old Baldy. When we got to the lighthouse, it seemed that we were far less interested in shooting the outside than in finding all the grungy goodness inside. On the bottom floor, we weren’t disappointed at all, for we discovered this ancient wooden staircase alongside crumbling brick.

The textures were alluring, from the stair railing polished by years of people hanging on for dear life, the risers kicked by countless toes, and the brick and stucco that needs constant repair.

It was quite warm in there as we worked several angles just inside the entrance. When we had exhausted our possibilities there, we climbed the narrow stairs, reaching several landings before finally climbing a steep ladder through a narrow passage into the top section. There, at the top, basking in the rays of the sun shining through thick glass, we endured a heat index of about 120 degrees. We didn’t stay up there too long…

Please be sure to visit Bob Lussier’s blog today for his image Baldy Steps, taken at the same spot.

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“Old Baldy” Lighthouse   12 comments


"Old Baldy"
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Meeting up with Bob Lussier during his visit to North Carolina, we decided to investigate a place I had never been, the Bald Head Island lighthouse, affectionately referred to as “Old Baldy.” This is the oldest standing — but no longer functioning — lighthouse in N.C., and was a worthy target not so much for the exterior shots, but for the rustic interior where Bob and I spent most of our time.

You can only reach this place by passenger ferry. Although the wait for the next boat was long, it gave Bob and I chance to have lunch and settle in with each other before we commenced to blasting away with the cameras inside the tower.

This is the obligatory outside shot. Soon, I’m sure, both Bob and I will be posting some images taken inside, where it was about 120F degrees.

Be sure to visit Bob’s blog today. As I understand it, he’ll be posting a picture of me taking this shot, as we did the other day with our images of the Boathouse.

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Another Little Piece of Us   8 comments


Two kayaks beach on Shackleford Banks, overlooking the Cape Lookout lighthouse, North Carolina

Another Little Piece of Us

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Early on, I was going to title this something really boring, like, “Kayaks at Cape Lookout.”

While not the most outstanding of images, it does reveal a bit more about our lives and interests, and I don’t suppose that’s a bad thing to do at this point. In fact, only yesterday, Barbara Youngelson wrote a comment on my blog that seemed interestingly coincidental: “It’s so cool when we learn a little about the photographer/artist through his work.” How could she have known I was going to post this?

Following up on the last two images of the wild ponies at Shackleford Banks (NC), I thought I’d put up a picture of the boats that take us to the places we love so well. (Well, you can’t see Susan’s kayak, but it’s much like mine, only firecracker red and yellow.) These kayaks have taken us through many interesting adventures, visiting the Okefenokee Swamp on many occasions, the Florida Everglades, Key West, the Gulf Coast, as well as many more local trips along the rivers and sounds of NC.

In the background is the Cape Lookout Lighthouse, one of nine lighthouses and two light towers that grace the shoreline of North Carolina. They’re fun to visit, fun to climb, and serve as impressive backdrops to a day on the water. It’s also challenging to try to time the light for the picture… 12 seconds.

For those interested in such things, the boats are both made by Perception (now Harmony, I believe), and are gel coat over Kevlar with solid bulkheads, about 17′ long. The ‘Shadow’ in back is just a bit shorter than the ‘Eclipse’ in front. I think one of the best things about them is that they can take you places where other boats can’t go… we can still navigate even when the water is only about 6 inches deep. You’ll… umm… see that coming up soon.

Hand-held single exposure, Nikon D7000 with Nikkor 70-300mm f/3.5-5.6 lens at 70mm, ISO 100, f/11, 1/200s

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