Archive for the ‘spring’ Tag

Where Food Comes From (1)   1 comment


Where Food Comes From (1)

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I recently rented a couple of macro lenses from BorrowLenses.com, testing them out in our gardens.

Springtime is in full swing around here; lots of plants are budding out and blooming. As I honed in with the macro lenses, I was astonished at how well these lenses show us details that we might otherwise pass by without noticing much of anything. Some plants the we believe we’re familiar with take on a completely different appearance when seen closely.

As I was shooting, I recalled a scene from a movie we watched recently, Forks Over Knives, a documentary that examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods. The scene showed a school teacher holding up various vegetables to a group of young students. Many of the students failed to identify potatoes, tomatoes, and other “common” vegetables. Their experience of these foods tends to come only from highly processed and brightly packaged commercial product.

I find that sad.

In the next few weeks, I’ll be posting some of the macro images I’ve taken (and will continue to take!) Can you identify the plants? We’ll start out with something relatively straightforward.* Answer below.

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* It’s a baby blueberry. 🙂

A Mother’s Kiss   8 comments


A Mother's Kiss

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Love, for some, is another mouthful of juicy bugs.

We’ve set up a couple of birdhouses out in the garden. This one was made by Jeff Garvey, who creates beautiful birdhouses made entirely from reclaimed pieces of abandoned barns and houses. (Be sure to check out his Facebook page Recycling is for the Birds.)

Mom and Dad have been working tirelessly to bring the young ones all the food they need. One day, as Mom stopped at the birdbath nearby, she looked up as though to say, “I’m just so tired,” and then flew off in search of more food.

The day after this image was taken, the little ones left the nest. They’re still hanging around the homestead, getting the lay of the land and more bug chow from the parents.

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Working the Wisteria   5 comments


Working the Wisteria

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While shooting the interior of the house featured in “Life Amongst the Ruins“, I noticed that heavy growth of wisteria had taken over the back of the house. With its vibrant color, I thought it would make a good subject against the backdrop of weathered wood siding. It’s a fascinating plant in that for a week or two each spring, the colors really pop. After the decline of the blossoms, though, it begins to resemble nothing more than an invasive vine.

It wasn’t until I was post-processing this image that I noticed a little visitor. If you look closely just above the vine, near the bottom of the first slat, you’ll see someone who loves the flowers even more than we do.

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Temporary Beauty   9 comments


Temporary Beauty

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In North Carolina, as well as in other parts of the south, azaleas in bloom are the harbingers of spring, not unlike farther north with the return of robins or the melting of snowpack. Unfortunately, the blossoms only seem to last a short while before they drop to the ground, leaving only green foliage for the remainder of the summer.

“Natural beauty is essentially temporary and sad; hence the impression of obscene mockery which artificial flowers give us.” — John Updike

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“Nuffing”   8 comments


"Nuffing"
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There’s a guy at our local Farmer’s Market who makes birdhouses out of materials reclaimed from old barns and tobacco sheds. His larger pieces are works of art, and each has a history to it. Jeff can tell you exactly where each component came from, and the story behind the building.

For our new backyard arrangement, we’ve posted a few new bird abodes, and it wasn’t long before the renters came by to measure for curtains. We now have a family of Black Cap Chicadee in one box, and this family, which I believe is Tufted Titmouse. (Please correct me if I’m wrong.)

It was hard to get this shot — they move so fast! But, by setting up the tripod and doing a fast remote trigger, I managed to grab one or two images before they’d duck inside with more building materials.

I was delighted when I saw that I caught this guy. “What are you doing?”, I asked. “Nuffing.”

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Too Loaded to Fly   10 comments


Too Loaded to Fly

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On another nice, spring day (not like we’ve had winter here), I found the local bees working on our new lemon tree. This little guy was so loaded down with pollen that he could barely lift off. He’d fly up, lumber around seemingly in slow motion, and then set back down on the flower.

What to do if your flight is delayed? Go back and get more, of course.

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