Archive for the ‘wood’ Tag

Working the Wisteria   5 comments


Working the Wisteria

~

While shooting the interior of the house featured in “Life Amongst the Ruins“, I noticed that heavy growth of wisteria had taken over the back of the house. With its vibrant color, I thought it would make a good subject against the backdrop of weathered wood siding. It’s a fascinating plant in that for a week or two each spring, the colors really pop. After the decline of the blossoms, though, it begins to resemble nothing more than an invasive vine.

It wasn’t until I was post-processing this image that I noticed a little visitor. If you look closely just above the vine, near the bottom of the first slat, you’ll see someone who loves the flowers even more than we do.

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries & Prints

Life Amongst the Ruins   6 comments


Life Amongst the Ruins

~

After meeting up at Jeff’s place, where Grandfather’s Legacy was taken, we cruised out to a couple of good ‘Rurex’ locations for more pictures. These are locations where Jeff – with permission – carefully dismantles old buildings for repurposing into birdhouses and furniture. It’s a way of giving a second life to these old and neglected beauties.

Sadly, in many cases the houses and barns have been hit by vandals, who seem to have no respect for their history. While not unusual or surprising, it is a bit startling to see the damage they can do to a place.

We carefully picked our way through the center hall of this 1920’s American Foursquare to the back of the house, and I was struck by the juxtapositional nature of the ruins against the spring green fields and vining wisteria. Left alone, they would eventually become one.

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries & Prints

I Know, It’s Only Rock and Rail   12 comments


I Know, It's Only Rock and Rail
~

There’s a nice little walk to be had at the Ship Harbor Nature Trail on Mt. Desert Island, Maine. At the end of the trail, there’s an extensive area of jumbled rock and tidal pools where you can pull up a seat and watch…. things.

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries | Facebook

Under the First Layer   4 comments


Under the First Layer
~

To the same location where Molasses and I Fought the Lawn… were shot, I returned the other day with prints in hand to give to the elder Mr. Riggs, who owns the granary and feed store on the property. It was my way of getting him to allow unfettered access to the remainder of the property… and it worked. Well, he wouldn’t let me inside any of the buildings, but there was much to be seen as I worked my way through the woods and fields.

There’s nothing modern about this place. All the barns, silos, and tin buildings are worn and weathered, with some close to collapse.

I worked my way around one large building and found this vignette on the back and propped my tripod between the building and a large pecan tree that had fallen thanks to Hurricane Irene. I marveled at the slow collapse of the wooden siding, boards holding on by just a few nails here and there, and the weathered look of old tar paper and wood being revealed bit-by-bit over time.

~

This is a 9-frame HDR processed using both Photomatix Pro and HDR Express/32 Float. Also of note is that post-processing in Photoshop was done with the brandy-new Color Efex Pro 4 from Nik Software, now in beta. We’ve just been released to speak of the new program, and lemme tell you… it’s a great update!

500px | Google+ | Follow on Twitter | Galleries | Facebook

Early American Screen Door   11 comments


An Early American Screen Door

~
Just one of the many fun things about photography is that in researching your subjects, you can learn new things. I can’t suggest the number of times I’ve taken a picture of something interesting, only to find out more about it when I got home and cruised the internet looking for more information.

When I first developed this image, I decided to call it ‘Early American Screen Door.’ I figured that the wood slats on this shed door had deteriorated to the point that you could see through, and the wind would whistle through.

I showed the finished image to my neighbor — the one whose family farm is featured in GOAL!!, Cooning Boat, and Put Me In, Coach! The neighbor said, “The door is made that way deliberately in order to ventilate the corn crib.”

Call me a city boy, but I never knew that. Now it makes perfect sense.

I seem to always be pleasantly surprised at the ingenuity of previous generations during a time when there weren’t the amenities and conveniences that today we take too much for granted.

Follow on Twitter | Galleries | Friend on Facebook

%d bloggers like this: